Volcanic spring of Borjomi

Borjomi water is sourced from a 1,500 year old volcanic spring where the natural pressure of carbon dioxide pushes water to the surface from 10km underground.

Unlike many sodium bicarbonate waters, Borjomi spring water does not have to time to cool before reaching the surface at a temperature of 38-41oC. On its journey upwards, the rocks of the Caucasian mountains enrich the water with over 60 different mineral compounds. Research has found that deep mineralised waters, fresh waters and weakly mineralised waters form Borjomi spring water.

There are several theories as to how water materialises in the depths of the earth. The earliest is infiltration theory, which was introduced by a Roman architect named Marcus Vitruvius Pollio and is still in use by scientists today. According to this theory, atmospheric precipitation produces water underground (ground water), which infiltrates to the surface through cracks in the rock.

In the 19th century Otto Volger, a German geologist introduced a new theory suggesting that ground water was produced in subsoil through condensation of atmospheric water vapours.

Most recently, the juvenile water theory was developed by the Viennese geologist Eduard Suess. This theory points to a relation between certain types of mineral water and earth magma. Suess concluded that materials from molten magma condense when released into areas of a lower temperature, forming juvenile (i.e. pristine) waters, which reach the surface as natural springs. On reaching the surface the water is no longer truly “pristine”. Pushed by volcanic gases through cracks in the earth, juvenile water dissolves the rock and carries away its minerals. Along its path it also mixes with ground water of different origin, including infiltrated water.

In the 1990s a study into Borjomi water discovered that its proportion of hydrogen isotopes is unique from other types of mineral water. The study suggested that an unusually large portion of Borjomi water comprises “pristine” juvenile water; perhaps the secret of the water’s origin can explain this uniqueness in mineral value.

Borjomi water is sourced from a 1,500 year old volcanic spring where the natural pressure of carbon dioxide pushes water to the surface from 10km underground.

Unlike many sodium bicarbonate waters, Borjomi spring water does not have to time to cool before reaching the surface at a temperature of 38-41oC. On its journey upwards, the rocks of the Caucasian mountains enrich the water with over 60 different mineral compounds. Research has found that deep mineralised waters, fresh waters and weakly mineralised waters form Borjomi spring water.

There are several theories as to how water materialises in the depths of the earth. The earliest is infiltration theory, which was introduced by a Roman architect named Marcus Vitruvius Pollio and is still in use by scientists today. According to this theory, atmospheric precipitation produces water underground (ground water), which infiltrates to the surface through cracks in the rock.

In the 19th century Otto Volger, a German geologist introduced a new theory suggesting that ground water was produced in subsoil through condensation of atmospheric water vapours.

Most recently, the juvenile water theory was developed by the Viennese geologist Eduard Suess. This theory points to a relation between certain types of mineral water and earth magma. Suess concluded that materials from molten magma condense when released into areas of a lower temperature, forming juvenile (i.e. pristine) waters, which reach the surface as natural springs. On reaching the surface the water is no longer truly “pristine”. Pushed by volcanic gases through cracks in the earth, juvenile water dissolves the rock and carries away its minerals. Along its path it also mixes with ground water of different origin, including infiltrated water.

In the 1990s a study into Borjomi water discovered that its proportion of hydrogen isotopes is unique from other types of mineral water. The study suggested that an unusually large portion of Borjomi water comprises “pristine” juvenile water; perhaps the secret of the water’s origin can explain this uniqueness in mineral value.